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Eastern Promises at San Sebastian IFF

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pall adriennFeature films by Ferenc Török, György Pálfi, Nimród Antal, Roland Vranik, Kornél Mundruczó and Ágnes Kocsis enrich San Sebastian International Film Festival's "Eastern Promises. Autobiography of Eastern Europe" retrospective.
Marcell Gerő's latest documentary, CAIN'S CHILDREN will be premiered in New Directors Competition of the A-category festival.

"Eastern Promises. Autobiography of Eastern Europe" is the title of the retrospective to be screened at this year's 62nd San Sebastian Festival, a look at movies produced since 2000 in the countries that lived under Soviet influence post-World War II. A cycle to discover the creative wealth of these film industries and the new talents to have emerged in the last decade.
This year marks the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. An occurrence which brought an end to the division of Europe that had marked the Cold War and to Soviet domination in these countries, totally separated ideologically and culturally from the rest of Europe. From then on, a series of momentous historical events completely changed the political geography of the countries forming that bloc traditionally known as "Eastern Europe".
As was to be expected, these changes, which radically transformed the former communist societies in barely 25 years, are reflected in the cinema produced in those countries, a cinema which now brings us a record and testimony of that social and political process. All propose new perceptions for today's spectators depicted in the myriad themes, genres and styles included in the retrospective: social drama, comedy of manners, thrillers, movies about teens, science fiction, documentaries or war films.
The retrospective will bring together a total of 50 titles from Bosnia, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Kosovo, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Moldavia, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia and Serbia, many of which have never been seen in our country.

 



Hungarian Directors in Eastern Promises Retrospective

MOSZKVA TÉR / MOSCOW SQUARE – 1st feature
Ferenc Török  (Hungary)  2001
The Berlin Wall fell in 1989, but a group of teenagers from Budapest don't seem to care. Yet underlying their carefree lives is a complete chronicle of recent Hungarian history and the social changes they will have to deal with.

HUKKLE – 1st feature
György Pálfi  (Hungary)  2002
Gyorgi Pálfi, one of Hungarian cinema's most hallowed names, needs no dialogue to describe various snapshots of life in a small rural community to the rhythm of an old man with hiccup. Special Mention in the Zabaltegi New Directors section of the San Sebastian Festival in 2002.

KONTROLL / CONTROL – 1st feature
Nimród Antal  (Hungary)  2003
One of the most suggestive surprises to come out of Hungarian cinema in recent years is this nocturnal, surrealist fable about the fauna that inhabits the metro in Budapest: ticket controllers pushed to the limit, serial killers, expert ticket skivers, and girls who look like fairies. Winner of the Youth Prize at the Cannes and Warsaw Festivals.

FEKETE KEFE / BLACK BRUSH – 1st feature
Roland Vranik  (Hungary)  2005
The best tradition of American independent cinema with a purely Hungarian touch: a surrealist comedy in black and white about four chimney sweeps, the absurd situations they experience and their laconic discussions.  

JOHANNA
Kornél Mundruczó  (Hungary)  2005
Kornél Mundruczó reinterprets the story of Joan of Arc in a bold and surprising film that breaks down the barriers between film and opera to transfer the mythical character to modern Hungary. Presented in the Un Certain Regard section at the Festival de Cannes in 2005.

PÁL ADRIENN
Ágnes Kocsis  (Hungary - France - Austria - Netherlands)  2010
Presented in the Un Certain Regard section at the Festival de Cannes, this film by Hungarian moviemaker Ágnes Kocsis introduces us to the life of a nurse addicted to cream cakes and her odyssey in search of time past by means of a dazzling, ice-cold visual style.

Screenings



World premiere

CAIN’S CHILDREN / KÁIN GYERMEKEI in New Directors Comptetion
a feature-length documentary film by Marcell Gerő
produced by Sára László (Campfilm, Hungary) and Jacques Bidou, Marianne Dumoulin (JBA Production, France)

Three men, they all committed murder as children. They passed their entire youth in communist Hungary’s most brutal prison, where they were first filmed. Disturbing archive footage shows them confessing details of their crime, and sharing their plans for the future. Thirty years on the filmmaker goes out to find them and discovers untold secrets and a Hungary he has never known. Fate, sin, and legacy – seen through the eyes of Cain’s children. 

Screenings

kain gyermekei kez